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Archive of "News" Category

Exploring Frames On A Difficult Subject

Jenny Rudolph provides a great example of an interviewer exploring frames on a difficult subject, slavery. Listen to NPR’s Rene Montagne’s advocacy plus inquiry and follow up skills as she interviews director Steve McQueen and British actor Chiwetel Ejiofor, who plays Solomon Northup, a kidnapped free man, forced into slavery.  The film, 12 Years a Slave, tells about the perils of plantation life and the inspiration the actor and director drew from Northup’s own words.

Listen to the interview: http://www.npr.org/2013/10/17/235486707/12-years-a-slave-160-years-later-a-memoir-becomes-a-movie

 

 

 

 

CMS Announces Simulation Instructor Workshop in New York

CMS Faculty will be heading to New York in late October to teach the internationally recognized Institute for Medical Simulation (IMS) “Simulation As A Teaching Tool” Simulation Instructor Workshop at the Institute for Medical Simulation and Learning (IMSAL) at the Jacobi Medical Center in the Bronx.

Taught by CMS’ Harvard faculty, the Simulation as a Teaching Tool Workshop is a 4-day intensive immersion in healthcare simulation that is specifically designed for those educators seeking to develop high quality simulation programs. It covers all the high level elements and concepts involved in using simulation as a teaching tool.

Drawing on the disciplines of aviation, healthcare, psychology, experiential learning, and organizational behavior, participants learn how to teach clinical, behavioral, and cognitive skills through simulation. Participants explore simulator based teaching methods applicable across the healthcare education spectrum, including undergraduate and graduate medical, nursing and allied health domains.

The daily formats vary and include simulation scenarios, lectures, small and large group discussions, and practical exercises with feedback. Ample opportunities are provided for networking and sharing experiences. Attendees join a growing community of Institute graduates who are positioned as leaders in the field.

Dates: October 29 – November 1, 2013

Tuition for this workshop is $4,250

Simulation Instructor Workshop Flyer

To apply for this course email Benny Turner at
Benny.Turner@nychhc.org or phone (718) 975-6517.

 

 

CMS 2013 Year End Update

2013 Update

Since June 30th marks the end of CMS’ 2013 fiscal year, We thought this would be a great time to look back at some of the key events that occurred during the past year.

Move to the Charlestown Navy Yard

I don’t believe it would be an understatement to say that the biggest event that occurred this year was our move to a new facility in the historic Charlestown Navy Yard in Boston.  After ten years at our site on Landsdowne Street in Cambridge, we received notice from our landlord in January 2012 that our rent was going to quadruple. Needless to say this was going to have a significant effect on our finances. We were able to work out an arrangement where the full impact of the increase would not be felt until September, but we knew there was no way we could afford to stay there long term. This led to a mad dash to find new space. Fortunately, we were referred to an amazing realtor, Bob Richardson, and an equally amazing lawyer, Dianne McDermott, who helped us find space and negotiate a new lease in record time so that by September of last year we had a lease for 13,000 square feet in the attic of a building at 100 First Avenue in the Navy Yard known as the Carriage House – Ordinance Shop that was built in 1866. It was a “funky” space with high ceilings, skylights and huge oak beams. It hadn’t been occupied for years and required a lot of imagination to see how it could work. Initially, even our Realtor was skeptical, but we knew the space was right for us.  At this point we had another stroke of luck and were referred to Wise Construction Corporation and two of their employees, Bill Olson and Rick Freedman. We had to vacate our old location by the end of December which meant the build out of the new space had to be completed in only three months. Everyone we spoke with said this was impossible, but under Bill’s and Rick’s supervision and with the help of our very patient friend and talented architect, Harvey Kirk, it was completed on time and on budget and we moved in right after Christmas.

In the end, an insane rent increase turned into a great opportunity. We now have a fabulous simulation center that’s double the size of our old location and at half of the quadrupled rent. We have more simulation space, plenty of storage, our own conference center and room to expand. Everyone who visits loves the space with its high slanted ceilings, skylights and huge exposed oak beams. If you’re in Boston come by and visit. We’re at 100 First Avenue, 4th Floor, Suite 400 in Boston. Click here to see pictures of the construction of the new site and our open house.

Institute for Medical Simulation

2013 was a banner year for our Institute of Medical Simulation. In addition to the Graduate Course and the seven, week long, Comprehensive Simulation Instructor courses held in Cambridge and Boston, we taught another ten courses at sites all over the world including Philadelphia, Denver, New York, Sydney Australia, Brisbane Australia, and Singapore. While in Australia we held our 200th course since starting the Institute in 2004. (If you’re interested in having CMS teach a course at your site email me at grossi1@partners.org.) And, in December we introduced a new simulation instructor course for operating room teams.

Clinical Courses

Our clinical courses continued to grow. We recently held the 2,000th course since we first started in 1994. We held forty-one day long MOCA®/CRM courses in 2013 with anesthesiologists attending from as far away as California, Texas, New Mexico, Nevada, Florida, and western Canada. Attendance at our Labor & Delivery courses boomed as several hospitals and one of the state’s largest group medical practices started requiring all of their obstetricians and midwives to attend. And, we added a new Disclosure and Apology course in collaboration with Boston Children’s Hospital. The first D&A course was held in October to great success and we plan on holding several more in fiscal 2014.

Affiliate Program

Our Affiliate program expanded this year with the addition of the IMSAL/New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation. We renewed our Affiliation with the Hospital Virtual Valdecilla in Santander Spain and in May we signed a letter of intent for the Hong Kong Academy of Medicine to become our newest Affiliate on July 1st, 2014.

IMSH 2013

CMS was well represented at the International Meeting for Simulation in Healthcare held in San Diego this past January. As in years past, CMS’ booth in the exhibit hall was well attended and the IMS Alumni reception was a huge success. Our own Jenny Rudolph was chosen to present the “Lou Oberndorf Lecture on Innovation in Healthcare Education.” During the meeting, Robert Simon, was honored with a Simmy Greatest Hits Award for Best Article. The article: Morey, Simon, Jay et al. Error reduction and performance improvement in the emergency department through formal teamwork training: evaluation results of the MedTeams project. Health Services Research. Dec 2002: 37(6): 1553-1581 has been identified as a seminal article in teamwork training. Jenny Rudolph chaired a State of the Art Meeting (SOTA) that brought together leaders from key healthcare simulation disciplines to examine simulation learning environments and simulation faculty development. Robert Simon, Janice Palaganas, and Roxane Gardner held a session during the Educational Symposium regarding In-situ simulation: how to keep safe while keeping your patients safe. Robert Simon hosted a talk show with his special guests:  Janice Palaganas and Roxane Gardner and eleven international callers, exploring challenges in in-situ simulation, as well as different models to address those challenges. Toni Walzer led this year’s workshop on debriefing as formative assessment with other CMS’ers (Jenny Rudolph, Robert Simon, Dan Raemer, Laura Rock, Elaine Tan and Jose Maestre). The workshop blended didactic and experiential approaches to provide participants with the concepts and experience to conduct formative assessments using debriefing.  The session was also run in Spanish by Jenny Rudolph and Demian Szyld along with Jose Maestre and Ignacio del Moral. Jeff Cooper and Gary Rossi participated in a panel discussion on issues that arise between Administrative and Executive Directors that featured panelists acting out vignettes of common issues.

Personnel News

In other news of note, Jeff Cooper, CMS’ Executive Director, was elected to receive the 2013 Distinguished Service Award at 2012 annual meeting of the American Society of Anesthesiologists. Jeff is the first non-clinician to receive the Society’s highest award which is given for meritorious service and achievement and is based on his outstanding career and his impact on anesthesia and patient safety. Jenny Rudolph, along with colleagues John Carroll and Brad Morrison, received The Jay W. Forrester Award.  The Forrester Award recognizes the best work in the field of system dynamics published in the previous five years.  Doctors Carroll, Morrison and Rudolph were recognized for their paper, “The dynamics of action-oriented problem solving:  linking interpretation and choice,” published in the Academy of Management Review in 2009 and was based on Dr. Rudolph’s doctoral dissertation conducted here at the Center for Medical Simulation. And last, but not least Janice Palaganas, PhD, RN, MSN, CRNP, CEN came on board in January as CMS’ newest Faculty member. Prior to joining CMS, Janice was the Director for Research & Development for the Medical Simulation Center at Loma Linda University.

Announcing Simulation Instructor Workshops for 2013-2014

The Center for Medical Simulation (CMS) is pleased to announce its 2013-2014 Institute for Medical Simulation Workshop schedule. Recognized as a world leader in simulation education, CMS offers workshops at its Boston location and at host sites throughout the United States and the world. Click on this link (CMS Simulation Instructor Workshops 2013 to 2014) for the schedule .

CMS’ Institute for Medical Simulation (IMS) evolved from research developed through a collaborative project between the Center for Medical Simulation and the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology funded by a grant from the Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation. IMS offers workshops for simulation leaders, educators and researchers who want to develop and maintain high-quality healthcare simulation programs within their organizations.  Attendees call the workshops transformational.  Current workshops include:

Comprehensive Instructor Workshop: 5 days
Established in 2004 and updated through the years, this is the Institute’s most comprehensive and immersive program. Attendees represent a wide range of experience, disciplines and specialties, but all share one common goal: to become outstanding educational leaders or directors of a current or prospective simulation program. With experiential education being the keystone of simulation, the course is a mix of theory, practice and feedback so that students develop a strong and comprehensive understanding of how to most effectively use simulation within their education programs. Widely respected, dedicated educators with years of simulation experience lead the course with one main goal in mind: Transform every IMS student to be an outstanding educator.  Click here for a schedule

Simulation as a Teaching Tool: 4 Days
For simulation educators who seek to create high-quality healthcare simulation programs. This course immerses healthcare simulation instructors in a multi method course wherein participants learn how to teach clinical, behavioral, and cognitive skills through simulation. It draws from the disciplines of aviation, healthcare, psychology, experiential learning, and organizational behavior. Participants explore simulator-based teaching methods applicable across the healthcare education spectrum, including undergraduate and graduate medical, nursing and allied health domains. The daily formats vary and include; simulation scenarios, lectures, small and large group discussions, and practical exercises with feedback. Typically these courses also offer a couple of social evenings for networking and sharing experiences.

Advanced Debriefing: 4 Days 
For those Graduates of an IMS course, either held in Cambridge or at a host site, this course will enhance and extend instructional techniques learned in the Simulation Instructor Course.  Through extensive practice and feedback, attendees will become better and more reflective about their instructional practices. And, they will become more able to help other faculty within their institution improve their instructional techniques.  Led by highly experience IMS Faculty the workshop combines didactic and experiential learning with practice and feedback.  Participants will run and debrief one of their own scenarios; learn how to use an Action Science technique to reflect on debriefings; learn how to assess the quality of debriefings. There will be some didactics, but mainly the course will be very interactive and engaging.

Graduate Course: 4 Days 
For those Graduates of an IMS course, either held in Boston or at a host site, this course is designed to refresh and extend the educational and leadership repertoire of IMS Graduates. The course varies each year so prior attendees often repeat this course. While there are several goals for each year’s Graduate Course, two of them are always to deepen and improve debriefing skills, and to foster attendees’ ability to train simulation instructors within their home institutions.  The intent of the course is to continue to build camaraderie and support within the IMS community of practice and to prepare leaders in simulation for the challenges and opportunities involved in bringing significant reform to healthcare education. 

DASH Rater Training: 4 1/2 Hour Webinar
Debriefing clinical simulation experiences is widely understood as a crucial step in clarifying and consolidating insights and lessons from simulations. The Debriefing Assessment for Simulation in Healthcare (DASH) is designed to assist in evaluating and developing faculty debriefing and instructional skills. The DASH Webinars are designed for simulation educators interested in rating individuals in the use of the Debriefing Assessment for Simulation in Healthcare (DASH) tool. The DASH is a widely used instrument with known psychometric properties. It is designed to be applied in a variety of healthcare disciplines and simulation settings and can be used for summative or formative evaluation. DASH users are invited to participate in the (growing) worldwide DASH database that, as it matures, will provide contributors and researchers with useful data for their programs.

Founded in 1993, The Center for Medical Simulation (CMS) was one of the world’s first healthcare simulation centers and continues to be a global leader in the field.  At CMS the focus is on communication, collaboration, and crisis management training in order to develop skills and teamwork behaviors that are best learned actively under realistic conditions.  Since it first opened in 1993, CMS has  trained thousands of participants in its innovative and  challenging programs. Contact Gary Rossi, COO at 617.726.3041 / grossi1@partners.org for more information.

 

CMS’ Dan Raemer has a memorable visit with Stephen Abrahamson, PhD

 

On a recent trip to California, CMS’ Dan Raemer had the opportunity to meet one of his personal heroes, Dr. Stephen Abrahamson.  Dan reports that he spent a wonderful afternoon with Dr. Abrahamson and his wife reminising about his career in medical education and the development of the first computerized mannequin simulator, Sim One. 

In the late 60′s Dr. Abrahamson, an engineer and medical educator, and Judson Denson, MD led the team from the University of Southern California that developed Sim One.  Sim One was initally developed with the idea of training anthesthesia residents in endotracheal intubation.  This was later expanded in the early 70′s to include training interns, medical students, nurses, inhalation therapists and other healthcare professionals.  Although studies showed simulator training to be effective in improving student performance, Sim One and simulator training were ahead of their time.  In the early 70′s there was too much resistance to anything outside of the traditional apprenticeship model of medical training, and Sim One was felt to be too limited in scope and expensive for commercialization.  After Sim One, Dr. Abrahamson went on have a distinguished career at the Kerr School of Medicine at USC where he led the Division of Medical Education serving as a change agent and innovator who helped transform the entire field of medical education.

Dan Raemer, PhD is the Director of Research and Development at the Center for Medical Simulation. In 2003 Dan received a unique award from the Harvard Department of Anaesthesia for “excellence in teaching”. Using simulation as a research tool to investigate healthcare worker’s behaviors and thought processes has been his most enduring passion.  Dan has published work in these areas and has given numerous keynote addresses for specialty societies and other healthcare organizations on simulation as it has blossomed in the last several years. Dan is the founding trustee and a Past-President of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare (SSH).  In 2008, Dan received a “Lifetime Achievement Award” from SSH for his contributions to the field. He is also a Past-President of the Society for Technology in Anesthesia.

CMS’ Jeffrey Cooper, Ph.D., elected the ASA Distinguished Service Award for 2013

CMS’ Jeffrey B. Cooper, PhD was elected to receive the 2013 Distinguished Service Award at the recent annual meeting of the American Society of Anesthesiologists in Washington, DC.  Dr. Cooper is the first non clinician to receive the Society’s highest award which is given for meritorious service and achievement and is based on his outstanding career and his impact on anesthesia and patient safety.

Jeffrey B. Cooper, Ph.D. is the founder and Executive Director of the Center for Medical Simulation, which is dedicated to the use of simulation in healthcare as a means to improve the process of education and training and to avoid risk to patients. He is also Professor of Anaesthesia at Harvard Medical School. He received his BS in Chemical Engineering and MS in Biomedical Engineering from Drexel University in 1968 and 1970 respectively and completed a PhD in Chemical Engineering at the University of Missouri in 1972. Starting soon thereafter with the Bioengineering Unit in the Department of Anesthesia at Massachusetts General Hospital, he led the team that conducted seminal studies of critical incidents and human error in anesthesia. During the same time, he was leading a team that developed one of the first microprocessor-based medical technologies, the Boston Anesthesia System, aimed at integrating functions for the ultimate purpose of reducing human and system errors. Both of these efforts have catalyzed changes in anesthesia practice in the ensuing years. In April, 2009, Dr. Cooper retired as Director of Biomedical Engineering for the Partners Healthcare System, Inc., a technology development and service department that he organized and led for 15 years.

Dr. Cooper was a lead member of the group that created the first safety-related standards for anesthesia, equivalent versions of which have since been adopted in the US and throughout the world. He is a co-founder of the Anesthesia Patient Safety Foundation (APSF), serving continuously on its Executive Committee and for 13 years as Chairman of it Committee on Scientific Evaluation. He is now an APSF Executive Vice President. He serves on the Board of Governors of the National Patient Safety Foundation and founded its Research Program, which he chaired for seven years.

Dr. Cooper is one of the pioneers in diffusion and innovation in healthcare simulation. He has led CMS to become one of the premier simulation programs in the world. Among the more innovative programs he has created or co-developed are the Institute for Medical Simulation, live, interactive simulation video-teleconferencing and the novel Healthcare Adventures (program for training healthcare administrators and leaders in teamwork via realistic simulation). He has mentored the faculty of CMS since its inception and has stimulated, participated in and advised on various research projects.

In addition to the ASA’s Distinguished Service Award, Dr. Cooper has received numerous honors for his work in patient safety, including the 2003 John M. Eisenberg Award for Lifetime Achievement in Patient Safety from the National Quality Forum and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations and the 2004 Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Academy of Clinical Engineering. In 2009 the Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care of the Massachsetts General Hospital established the Jeffrey B. Cooper Patient Safety award in his honor.

Congratulations Jeff, from all your teammates here at CMS!

       

      

    

      

       

    

      

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

Boston Simulation Community Research and Education Meeting Next Tuesday, September 11th from 5:30-7pm at CMS

Please join us for the next Boston Simulation Community Research and Education Meeting this coming Tuesday, September 11th from 5:30-7pm at the Center for Medical Simulation, 65 Landsdowne Street, Cambridge MA.

September 11th, 2012: “Prop Chart” a cost-effective, visual model to analyze the effectiveness of simulation training courses

Annemarie Fransen, MD and Guid Oei, MD PhD

Training of medical staff is essential for safe patient care. The nature of a medical training can range from lectures to medical simulation with expensive simulators. However, training of medical experts can be challenging. Not only, because of hierarchical problems, but also because of fear of failure and unwillingness to change, or play a role. To support deliberate practice in learning by simulation as while simultaneously controlling costs, we developed a visual model, named the Prop chart. This chart can also be used for evaluating existing medical simulation programs. The background and the use of the Prop chart will be presented by a videoconference during the research meeting on the 11th of September.

More about Drs Fransen and Oei

Annemarie Fransen, MD

  • Resident at the department of Obstetrics & Gynecology of Máxima Medical Centre, Veldhoven, The Netherlands.
  • PhD student

 Guid Oei, MD PhD.

  • Obstetrician at the Máxima Medical Centre, Veldhoven
  • The Netherlands and Professor at the department of elektrotechnical engineering of Eindhoven Technical University, The Netherlands
  • Medical director at the simulation centre Medsim, Eindhoven, The Netherlands

The Boston Community Simulation Community Research and Education Meetings provide a friendly and informal venue for simulation educators and researchers to present work-in-progress, acquaint each other with relevant ideas from other disciplines and connect with others. Please join us!

CMS Welcomes Janice Palaganas To Its Team!

The Center for Medical Simulation welcomes Janice Palaganas, PhDc, RN, MSN, CRNP, CEN as its newest Faculty member. Prior to joining CMS, Janice was the implementing Director of Accreditation and Certification for the Society for Simulation in Healthcare and continues as a member of the Board of Review for the Council for Accreditation of Healthcare Programs.  She was previously the Chief Operations Officer and Director for Research & Development for the Medical Simulation Center at Loma Linda University.  Janice has experience as faculty for schools of nursing, public health, MBA programs, emergency medicine and medicine.  She received her Bachelor’s of Science in Nursing, as well as two Masters degrees as an Adult Nurse Practitioner and Geriatric Nurse Practitioner; and one Masters certificate in Home Health Management from the University of Pennsylvania.  She is currently completing her PhD in Nursing at Loma Linda University exploring healthcare simulation as a platform for interprofessional education (IPE).  Since 2008, Janice has been involved nationally and internationally researching healthcare simulation for interprofessional education and was the Meeting Chair of the 2012 Healthcare Simulation and Interprofessional Education Symposium in San Diego, CA, participating in the Invitational Meeting that brought together 22 major healthcare professional organizations to come to consensus on how healthcare simulation can be a vehicle for IPE.

Janice has extensive Emergency Department experience at multiple facilities ranging from level I trauma centers, community hospitals, and fast tracks as an Emergency Nurse, Fast Track Nurse Practitioner, Clinical Educator, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Trauma Nurse Practitioner, Manager, and Director for Emergency and Critical Care Services, as well as Legal Nurse Consultant and House Supervisor.  She has presented at conferences regarding projects in simulation and on behalf of the Council for Accreditation of Healthcare Simulation Programs.  She has been an invited keynote speaker nationally and internationally to discuss simulation, patient safety, and/or accreditation. Amongst other leadership roles, she is Chair of the Interprofessional Education Affinity Group and a member of the Certification Committee and Technology & Standards Committee in the Society for Simulation in Healthcare, as well as an author for the National League for Nursing’s (NLN) study on high-stakes assessment using simulation for nursing students.  From her work with the NLN and SSH Accreditation, Janice has a particular interest in video assessment tool development.  She is also lead editor for the upcoming textbook, “Defining Excellence in Simulation Programs.”

On a more personal note, Janice enjoys anything that comes out of her kids’ mouths, photography, digital art, charcoal and acrylic art, and dance.  She is a techie at heart. She is also a classically trained pianist and (in a former life) was a dancer, choreographer and hip-hop instructor.

Please join all of us here at CMS in welcoming Janice to our team!

Register Now For The IMS New York Simulation Instructor Workshop October 2-5

There’s still time to register for CMS’ upcoming Institute for Medical Simulation (IMS) Simulation Instructor Workshop being held from October 2-5 at the Institute for Medical Simulation and Learning (IMSAL) at the Jacobi Medical Center in New York.

Taught by CMS’ Harvard faculty, the “Simulation as a Teaching Tool Workshop” is a 4-day intensive immersion in healthcare simulation that is specifically designed for those educators seeking to develop high quality simulation programs. It covers high level elements and concepts involved in using simulation as a teaching tool.

Drawing on the disciplines of aviation, healthcare, psychology, experiential learning, and organizational behavior, participants learn how to teach clinical, behavioral, and cognitive skills through simulation. Participants explore simulator based teaching methods applicable across the healthcare education spectrum, including undergraduate and graduate medical, nursing and allied health domains.

The daily formats vary and include simulation scenarios, lectures, small and large group discussions, and practical exercises with feedback. Ample opportunities are provided for networking and sharing experiences. Attendees join a growing community of Institute graduates who are positioned as leaders in the field.

Register Now – Seats are limited!

Dates: October 2-5, 2012
Tuition for this workshop is $4,225

To learn more about the workshop, or to apply, visit the Center for Medical Simulation (CMS) website’s IMS webpage at
http://www.harvardmedsim.org/ims.html. You can also email CMS at info@harvardmedsim.org , or call Gary Rossi, CMS’ COO at 617.768.8267

IMS New York Flyer

CMS’ Jenny Rudolph Receives Jay W. Forrester Award

The Jay W. Forrester Award was recently presented to John Carroll, Brad Morrison and Jenny Rudolph at the 30th International System Dynamics Conference, held at the University of St. Gallen, Switzerland.  The Forrester Award recognizes the best work in the field of system dynamics published in the previous five years.  Doctors Carroll, Morrison and Rudolph were recognized for their paper, “The dynamics of action-oriented problem solving:  linking interpretation and choice,” published in the Academy of Management Review in 2009  (full citation:  Rudolph, J, Morrison, J. B., Carroll, J. (2009) The dynamics of action-oriented problem solving:  linking interpretation and choice.  Academy of Management Review.  34(4): 733-756.)  It was based on Dr. Rudolph’s doctoral dissertation conducted at the Center for Medical Simulation (CMS).

The paper develops and tests a formal system dynamics model of sensemaking and action, using anesthesia as the empirical setting.  The data for the study came from simulated cases carried out at the Center for Medical Simulation and provides a large sample of fine-grained observational and quantitative data from a controlled environment.  The model is tightly grounded in the data and gives insight into the feedbacks between sensemaking and action that can cause anesthesiologists both to discover and fail to discover and correct a common diagnostic problems.

Everyone at CMS congratulates Dr. Rudolph, Dr. Carroll and Dr. Morrison on this outstanding achievement.